The Battle of Verneuil 17 August 1424

The Battle of Verneuil 17th August



1424


Tuesday, 3 April 2012

A Henry! A Henry! A Saint George!!

Hi,

Here's the next vignette out of the set of three that I cobbled together from the 'left overs' from my HYW English. Obviously this chap needs no introduction (if he did you probably wouldn't be reading this blog right?).

Henry himself is actually a Front Rank miniature but I found that he didn't look too out of place with the Perry stuff on the base and the slightly taller and chunkier sculpt accentuates his perceived stature as the great war leader he undoubtedly was.

So, here we have Henry V encouraging his troops to get stuck in to the melee, perhaps after the English ranks were pushed back by the initial French onslaught at Agincourt. He stands next to Sir John Codrington, Henry's Banner Bearer, who wears his own coat of arms. Codrington is from one of the Perry Dismounted Command Packs from their Agincourt to Orleans range but has had his poleaxe removed and a Front Rank (who do make excellent Late Medieval 'bits') sword carefully placed into his hand as carrying a poleaxe and holding up a banner would be very problematic on a Medieval battlefield! I then just drilled into his hand (again, very, very carefully!) and added the Royal Banner of England. finally the musician wears the Lancastrian livery used by Henry V, his brothers Bedford and Clarence (and possibly Humphrey of Glaucester too? Anyone out there know Glaucester's livery colours?).














Hope you enjoyed the pics and the text. Next up is Lord Camoys and Sir Thomas Erpingham.

15 comments:

  1. Great painting. The heraldry is fanastic, looking forward to seeing Camoys & Erpingham.

    Regards,
    Matt

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Matt,

      Thanks for the kind words.

      Happily Camoys and Erpingham already have their respective heraldry sculpted onto the miniatures so they were a lot easier to do.

      Delete
  2. Very nice work. You've done a great job painting Henry's surcoat (is that the right word for the heraldy bit worn over the armour? It's been so long since I did medievals, I can't remember). Anyway, smashing work.
    Is that flag commercially made? If so, by whome? I need some for my medieval chapsCheers,
    Mike

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks mate,

      The banners were hand drawn onto thickish paper and then painted.

      I would have probably put more detail into them given the time- more shading and more highlights. It's a bit late now as I have a rule that once it's been added to the miniature I try not to meddle with it for fear of bringing it loose!

      Delete
    2. That banner is your own work? Jumping cats!

      Delete
  3. Great painting. The heraldry is fanastic

    ReplyDelete
  4. Henry who ??? ;)

    Stunning work Darrell, I´m realy impressed,such details, like the tabards and the gems on the kins belt, top notch !!!!

    Henry V and the link to Sweden...

    Henrys younger sister Philippa was actualy Queen of Sweden, Norway and Denmark 1406-1430 by marriage to the King Erik of Pomerania.

    Queen Philippa served as the de facto regent of Sweden in 1420 and the regent of Denmark and Norway from 1423 to 1425...

    She was married on 26 October 1406 to Eric of Pomerania in Lund Cathedral. Philippa was actually the first documented princess in history to wear a white wedding dress during a royal wedding ceremony: she wore a tunic with a cloak in white silk bordered with grey squirrel and ermine.

    Philippa was given large parts of Sweden as her dowry. During the first years of their marriage the couple lived in Kalmar in Sweden, and Philippa was to spend much of her queenhood living in Sweden. It had been decided that she would be granted personal fiefs in only one of the three kingdoms, and that was to be Sweden. Her head lady-in-waiting was the Swedish noblewoman Lady Katarina Knutsdotter, granddaughter of Saint Bridget and former lady-in-waiting of Queen Margaret I of Denmark herself. She was a benefactor of Vadstena Abbey, where she was a frequent guest. She received The Most Noble Order of the Garter in 1408.

    During King Eric's periods of absence abroad, Philippa was effectively Regent. In Sweden, where she spent a lot of her time, she appears to have been de facto ruler even when the King was in residence. Eric evidently had great trust in Philippa. Both ancient and modern authors give a favourable account of her rule. It is even said that in certain matters she was more efficient than her husband. However, scholars have largely accepted this judgment of the Queen without going into detail.

    In 1422, Philippa presided over the Swedish council in order to solve a dispute between Swedish noble factions. During her husband's stay abroad from 1423 to 1425, she was Regent of the three Kalmar Union kingdoms. Among other acts, she made a treaty with some members of the Hansa states within the North-German Confederation concerning the validity of the coin-system.

    In 1426, she gathered support in Sweden for the war against Holstein; in the same year, she acquired Swedish support for the protection of Copenhagen against the Hanseatic League. In 1428, Philippa successfully organized the defence of Copenhagen against the Hanseatic League, a heroic feat later recounted by Hans Christian Andersen in Godfather's Picture Book (1868).

    At the time of her death in 1430, she was in Sweden on a diplomatic mission. She is described as one of few royals of the Kalmar Union who was actually popular outside Denmark.

    Sorry for the long post Darrell, couldent help it then it was a so good Swedish and Kalmar Union connection:)

    Best regards Dalauppror

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No problem mate. I'm always open to learning more about Late Medieval warfare and histroy in general.

      I may even publish it as a stand alone article with your permission of course?

      Darrell.

      Delete
    2. I try to get the chanse to force some Swedish history on you all;)

      Perfectly OK with me to publish it as a stand alone article, as I pinch the most of it at Wikipedia anyway... a least I knew about the story allready, but I´m not that good in writing english, so I have to make some shot cuts one a while;)

      One again thanks for sharing all the lovely painted minis !

      Best regards Dalauppror

      Delete
  5. Stunning work again Darrell, the Front Rank figure does mix fine with the Perry's I usually wouldn't put then together but they work very well together. And a great bit of unknown history (for me anyway) from Dalauppror. Two for the price of one!!! Top job!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Lovely work Darrell. The colours are really vibrant, thank you for sharing.

    Cheers,

    Helen

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks again for all your kind words guys.

    Darrell.

    ReplyDelete